Love Wisconsin? You'll love Wisconsin Life.
It's your place for engaging stories of the people that make Wisconsin feel like home.

Cow Chip Champ

South Milwaukee’s Terry Stramowski is widely recognized as the champ to beat… in the Wisconsin Cow Chip Throw and Festival.  Terry has taken first place during 18 of the annual events – and placed second in five other years.  What is her tossing secret?  What is her driving motivation?  We head to Prairie du Sac with Terry to investigate.   Thank us now for not broadcasting in smell-o-vision.

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My Wisconsin Water

We all have our own reasons for loving Wisconsin. For John Galligan, it’s the water. He tells us how he found his connection to the state.

John Galligan is a teacher and novelist in Madison.

Photo: John Galligan 

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Wisconsin Life #203

Meet a collection of people who share their Wisconsin life. Stories include: Frank Kovac, who built his own planetarium, a glider pilot who soars high over Wisconsin, a boxer who hopes to bring the sport back to UW-Madison, a profile of gospel group Queens of Harmony, a fire-loving hula hooper and author Michael Perry on crops.

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Mike Perry on Crops

Mike Perry shares a bit of his unique “Clodhopper” Wisconsin life… this time, describing the perils of raising crops on his farm a few seasons ago.

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Wisconsin Life #202

Meet a collection of people who share their Wisconsin life. Stories include: a paranormal investigation of the old Kewaunee County Jail, a humorous look at how to speak ‘Wisconsin,’ one of the last botanical artists, family tree needlepoint and an introduction to the traditional North Indian dance form, Bhangra.

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Making a Home

Ann Peters’ architect father designed and built her childhood home north of Fond du Lac. Everything about that house came to define her sense of place and what home means.

Ann Peters is the author of House Hold: A Memoir of Place, and is associate professor of English at Stern College, Yeshiva University.

Photo: Yeshiva University 

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Queens of Harmony

Ella Ray and her friends regularly sing to the heavens.  They’re part of a seven-member gospel quartet called the Queens of Harmony, and they’ve been singing around Milwaukee for almost 50 years.  Along with the joy of singing, their music has also taken these women around the world and brought them closer to one another.

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Fire Hooping

Sarah Sparkles and the “Madison Fire Tribe” love, well… fire.   Sarah also passionately loves hula hooping and has found a visually arresting way to combine the two activities. 

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Wisconsin Life # 201

Meet a collection of people who share their Wisconsin life. Stories include: a Vernon County man who lives off the grid, a group that helps kids with Autism build and fly drones, a look at Madison’s Roller Derby team, northern Wisconsin’s Loon Rangers and a Milwaukee blacksmith.

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Planetarium Builder

Frank Kovac loved to take groups outdoors to lead astronomy tours of the northwoods skies– but hated to have those tours thwarted by clouds.  So Frank says he took the next logical step… he built his own planetarium.  Frank now gives tours to more than 3000 people a year.

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School of Bhangra

Harmanjot Singh and his fellow dance troupe members are introducing Wisconsin to the traditional North Indian dance form of Bhangra.  The group performs at events held on the UW-Madison campus and holds workshops for those interested in learning this style of dance. 

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Family Trees

Lois Lawton records the history of her community… one stitch at a time.  Lois has spent decades hand-working personal needlepoint designs, crafted to reflect the life experiences of her friends and neighbors.  

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Botanical Artist

Kandis Elliot understands she has an “old-timey” job.  Back in the 1800’s scientists relied on artists to illustrate textbooks and wall charts, but in the digital age, much of that work has been replaced by photos.  Elliot is one of the few biological artists left, and she believes her paintings bring plants alive in a way that could never be achieved digitally.

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